Universal Credit Scam Hits Dating Apps

Users being enticed in with ‘get money quick’ scam.

Universal Credit Logo

After media outlets broke the details about the Universal credit scam leaving claimants up to £1,500 out of pocket, DPS Computing can exclusively reveal that the brazen scammers have now relocated to popular dating apps, including Grindr, in an attempt to find more people to scam.

Scammers are approaching people online suggesting that they can make £600 to £800 online in a matter of hours as long as you have a passport, driving license and bank card available.

Different stories have been encountered, but the most recent is that they have a contact that works within Job Centre Plus that would open an unspecified account in your name, process back payments and then close the JCP account after the payments had been deposited in your account.

Responding to common privacy fears, the scammers attempt to reassure would be victims by saying that your documents are uploaded directly to a government approved and authorised application and there is no need to pass your details directly to them.

Verifying through the app will avoid any interviews with an adviser at Job Centre Plus according to the scammers.

For facilitating this ‘free money’, the scammers demand 50% or more of the payment as a fee. However, unknowingly the money is likely to have been obtained via a fraudulent benefits claim which will leave the victim potentially thousands of pounds out of pocket as well as collectively costing the tax payer millions.

Despite the growing crisis, the government appears to be completely unable to put a stop to this scam and have today warned victims that they may still have to pay the money claimed back according to the BBC.

DPS Politics v1.02 Released

DPS Politics v1.02 has now been launched over at DPS Apps. The latest political simulation and game to drop on the scene has new exciting features and improvements

New features in this version include:

  • Joining a political party – not only can you view information about your favourite (or not-so-favourite!) political party but you can now also declare you allegiance and sign up as a virtual member in DPS Politics.
  • My Profile – your profile section has been spruced up a bit to include your party details, or, if you are currently without a party, declare that you are currently independent.
  • New political parties added – joining the Labour and Conservative parties in DPS Politics we now also have the Liberal Democracts, the Green Party and the Brexit Party.

Enjoy! And please let us know your comments below!

What is .well-known?

Comodo SSL Certificate logoIronically, not that well known – even among technies!

You’ve seen it in cPanel and you’re wondering what this new folder is. “Well known you say – certainly isn’t to me!”. As already mentioned you’re far from alone.

But have I…?

No, you’ve not. The first question you want in answering is, ‘have I been hacked’. All security-conscious website owners these days ask the very same question when random files and folders appear on their hosting area – and if they’re not, they should be!

On the contrary, having this folder is a demonstration of the fact that you are security conscious and you care about your visitors!

The reason you have your not-so-well-known well-known folder is because you are using the Comodo AutoSSL feature – a nifty little tool for effortlessly managing your websites SSL certificate. Comodo AutoSSL places text files in here that are used to validate the domain.

Why is it doing this?

Comodo AutoSSL is doing this as it uses the text files to validate your domain name. Comodo must validate your domain name prior to issuing it with an SSL certificate.

What should I do with .well-known?

Absolutely nothing. Just leave it there, let Comodo sort out your SSL’s and keep the valid and live a happy and secure web life!

What is WEB-INF?

JavaWEB-INF is a directory that forms part of the folder structure defining a web application. These folders can be found in Java applications and usually follow a common structure including the following files:

  • Web.xml – this is an XML file called a deployment descriptor.
  • Class files – usually packaged up in JARs

And the following folders:

  • ‘lib’ (library) – these contain files that are automatically added to the classpath at runtime.
  • ‘classes’ – files containing classes that are not packaged up in a JAR.

What is _notes?

Adobe Dreamweaver

_notes is a folder created by Adobe Dreamweaver that stores configuration files in a language called XML to basically keep track of the site synchronisation between your file system and that of your server.

Can I delete _notes?

Absolutely you can. But should you, or do you want to?

The answer might be simpler than you’re thinking. If you’re not using Adobe Dreamweaver, then absolutely you can. The _notes folder is to keep track of IDs in Dreamweaver between local sites and your remote server. No Dreamweaver means no requirement for the folder. And in a similar fashion to the __MACOSX folder, it’s useless tat in these circumstances. Commonly, these folders are left behind when a developer has previously used Dreamweaver but has moved away – usually in search of a more affordable (read: preferably free!) tool that doesn’t mean they have to take out a second mortgage!

But I’m still using Dreamweaver!

OK, the answers not as clear cut. But it’s not a definite yes to keeping it.

The key thing here is whether you use the Dreamweaver site synchronisation feature. If you don’t, then it’s still happy days – you can delete it. With most developers, including those using Dreamweaver, now approaching deployments in a much more simpler fashion a la FTP, or employing a more complex deployment process a la Git and using deployment pipelines, this feature is now for many developers obsolete.

If you’re using a modern deployment process and version control such as Git, you can take a look at this short article on how to prevent further _notes folders being created to prevent further clean up required. Some users have reported, in a rather understandably disgruntled manner – that this may not be as effective as it should be! This could be down to rather confusing nomenclature on Adobe’s part however, by having a design notes feature embedded within Dreamweaver which appears to be causing some confusion.